July 8 – Guest Lecture “Go-To Lines: Reading Political Life Writing in America” 🗓

July 8 – Guest Lecture “Go-To Lines: Reading Political Life Writing in America” 🗓

Irene Gammel
(Toronto Metropolitan University)

with Carlos Lozada (The New York Times)

 

Go-To Lines: Reading Political Life Writing in America

 

July 8, 2024, 15:10pm, N.206 (Campus Germersheim)

This event features Irene Gammel and Carlos Lozada discussing the role of life writing in political memoir and beyond. They delve into how these narratives address politicians’ lives under public scrutiny, particularly in the context of the Trump era, which has inspired a wave of books exploring personal and political identities and the shifts caused by the Trump era. Lozada focuses on the political aspects, while Gammel advocates for a feminist reevaluation of life writing, highlighting how personal narratives can embody political values such as care and empathy. They explore how personal stories, like those of #MeToo, can fuel resistance movements and how life writing narratives of public persons can reveal unexpected insights beyond their public personas.

Since coming to Toronto Metropolitan University in 2005, Dr. Irene Gammel has held positions as professor of English, Canada Research Chair in Modern Literature and Culture (2005; renewed 2011), and director of the Modern Literature and Culture Research Centre. She is the author and editor of fourteen books, including the internationally acclaimed Baroness Elsa: Gender, Dada and Everyday Modernity (MIT Press) and Looking for Anne of Green Gables (St. Martin’s Press), as well as over 50 peer-reviewed articles and chapters. Irene Gammel is well- known for her scholarship on gender and modernism. Her research has helped uncover the earliest roots of modern and feminist performance art, contributed to the consolidation of L.M. Montgomery Studies as an academic field, and claimed women‘s confessional discourses as a sub- discipline of autobiographical studies. As the Director of the Modern Literature and Culture (MLC) Research Centre, she has hosted and curated numerous exhibitions, symposia, and workshops; her passion is training students at all levels through experiential methods.

 

You can download the poster for the event here.

4th of July 2024 – Lectures, Exhibition, Get-together, Food and Drinks 🗓

4th of July 2024 – Lectures, Exhibition, Get-together, Food and Drinks 🗓

4th of July Events at the Obama Institute

July 4, 2024, 4-8 p.m., P4 & Foyer P2-P5 (Philosophicum)

What might the 4th of July mean to Americans and foreigners in general and especially in 2024?

From American Poetry to Money and American Identity to students’ takes on the meaning of the holiday: Join us in discussing the day’s importance and possible criticism but also in celebrating an informal Obama Institute summer get-together of students, faculty, and friends.

Food and drinks will be provided!

 

4-6 p.m. I Guest Talks I P 4

“World-losers elsewhere, conquerors here!”: The Fourth of July in American Poetry
Thomas Austenfeld
Université de Fribourg, Switzerland

Red, White, and Blue—and Greenbacks: Money and American Identity since the Civil War
Atiba Pertilla
German Historical Institute, Washington, DC, USA

 

6-8 p.m. I (Graduate) Student Project Exhibition
with Food and Drinks

Posters and other presentations by students from Dr. Claudia Görg’s and Dr. Allison Nick’s courses

Pizza, Snacks, and Drinks

 

You can download the poster for the event here.

July 2 – Guest Lecture “World War I, New York Dada, and Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven” 🗓

July 2 – Guest Lecture “World War I, New York Dada, and Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven” 🗓

Irene Gammel
(Toronto Metropolitan University)

“World War I, New York Dada, and Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven”

July 2, 2024, 09:40pm, N.106 (Campus Germersheim)

This lecture explores the intersection of World War I, New York Dada, and the impact of German- born Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. An experimental poet, performer, and Dadaist, the Baroness helped shape the New York avant- garde scene between 1913 and 1923. Known for her provocative challenges to American cultural norms, she embodied the radical spirit of Dada through her performances and writings. Severely impoverished, she also embodied Dada’s radical DIY aesthetic and materiality. The Baroness’s legacy and contributions to New York Dada are reevaluated, offering new insights into this transformative period in art history as well as considering the opportunities and challenges of writing an artist’s biography.

Since coming to Toronto Metropolitan University in 2005, Dr. Irene Gammel has held positions as professor of English, Canada Research Chair in Modern Literature and Culture (2005; renewed 2011), and director of the Modern Literature and Culture Research Centre. She is the author and editor of fourteen books, including the internationally acclaimed Baroness Elsa: Gender, Dada and Everyday Modernity (MIT Press) and Looking for Anne of Green Gables (St. Martin’s Press), as well as over 50 peer-reviewed articles and chapters. Irene Gammel is well- known for her scholarship on gender and modernism. Her research has helped uncover the earliest roots of modern and feminist performance art, contributed to the consolidation of L.M. Montgomery Studies as an academic field, and claimed women‘s confessional discourses as a sub- discipline of autobiographical studies. As the Director of the Modern Literature and Culture (MLC) Research Centre, she has hosted and curated numerous exhibitions, symposia, and workshops; her passion is training students at all levels through experiential methods.

 

You can download the poster for the event here.

July 1 – Guest Lecture “Dos Hemisferios: Racial Capitalism and the Problem of Latinidad in Hispano-American Newspapers in Paris and New York City, 1852-1856” 🗓

July 1 – Guest Lecture “Dos Hemisferios: Racial Capitalism and the Problem of Latinidad in Hispano-American Newspapers in Paris and New York City, 1852-1856” 🗓

David Luis-Brown
(Claremont Graduate University, CA, USA)

Dos Hemisferios: Racial Capitalism and the Problem of Latinidad in Hispano-American Newspapers in Paris and New York City, 1852-1856″

July 1, 2024, 15:10pm, N.206 (Campus Germersheim)

 

The phrase dos hemisferios (“two hemispheres”) captured the breathtaking ambition of two leading Spanish-language newspapers in Paris, El Eco de Ambos Mundos (1852-55) and its successor, El Eco Hispano-Americano (1854-72), to use the technology of the newspaper to bridge the vast distances separating Spanish-speakers in the Atlantic world through intellectual exchange and assertions of a coherent linguistic and cultural identity. What the papers variously characterized as “Spaniards,” the “raza latina” (the “Latin race”) or the Hispano-American people, today we term Latinidad—discourses on the culture and identity of Latin Americans and Latina/o/x people. Examining two-year runs of the Eco papers alongside the Cuban exile paper El Mulato (1854) in New York City, I show how these newspapers constructed implicit and explicit discourses of Latinidad linking the dos hemisferios, at times reinforcing racial capitalism and Spanish colonialism and at times criticizing their forms of exploitation and oppression, thereby expanding the bounds of Latinness. Very briefly, theories and histories of racial capitalism argue that racial differentiation is central to the processes of violent accumulation of capital and exploitation that are central to capitalism (Jenkins and Leroy, Melamed, C. Robinson, Singh).

 

David Luis-Brown is an associate professor in the Cultural Studies and English Departments at Claremont Graduate University. His research specializations include hemispheric Americas studies, Latino/a/x studies, black diaspora studies, and American literature and culture in general. He is the author of Waves of Decolonization: Discourses of Race and Hemispheric Citizenship in Cuba, Mexico and the United States (Duke University Press, 2008). Luis-Brown is working on two books: a critical edition and translation of Andrés Avelino de Orihuela’s Cuban 1854 antislavery novel, El Sol de Jesús del Monte, under submission at a university press; and Blazing at Midnight: Slave Rebellion and Social Identity in Cuban and U.S. Culture. One of the chief aims of Blazing at Midnight is to assess techniques of social categorization in predisciplinary social science, travel narratives, novels, periodicals, and visual culture.

 

You can download the poster for the event here.

 

June 27 – Guest Lecture “Selective Anti-Imperialism, Settler Colonialism and the Lure of Racial Capitalist Progress in Spanish-Language Periodicals in Paris” 🗓

June 27 – Guest Lecture “Selective Anti-Imperialism, Settler Colonialism and the Lure of Racial Capitalist Progress in Spanish-Language Periodicals in Paris” 🗓

David Luis-Brown
(Claremont Graduate University, CA, USA)

“Selective Anti-Imperialism, Settler Colonialism and the Lure of Racial Capitalist Progress in Spanish-Language Periodicals in Paris”

June 27, 2024, 18:15pm, P 109a (Philosophicum)

The Spanish-language newspapers El Eco de Ambos Mundos and El Eco Hispano-Americano of Paris engaged in an unprecedented, transnational collaboration among Latin Americans, exile and migrant hispanoamericanos and Spaniards in constructing a Hispano-American identity or Latinidad in opposition to U.S. imperialism from 1852 to 1855, well before the Chilean Francisco Bilbao and the Colombian José María Torres Caicedo coined the term América Latina in the summer of 1856 in Paris. There were two politically discordant sets of writing threading through these two newspapers. First, writers championed the “Latin race” as an important contributor to the alleged progress of capitalism, as in editorials by the Spaniard José Florez and in a series of articles by the pioneering Spanish Humboldtian natural historian and sociologist Ramón de la Sagra. In a second, dissenting note in the newspapers, a critical take on both U.S. imperialism and Spain’s intertwined legacies of colonialism, racial hierarchies and slavery emerged.

The topic of this talk is the contradiction between Latinidad’s opposition to U.S. imperialism in the newspapers’ coverage of Latin American news versus their oftentimes uncritical stance towards Spanish colonialism and Latin American settler colonialism. The newspapers’ coverage of Latin American news addressed U.S. imperial expansionism, U.S. and European filibusterism and the strong-arm politics of dictators and Spanish colonial governments as well as constitutional conventions and wars against Indigenous peoples.

This talk is an excerpt from a monograph in progress tentatively titled “Dos Hemisferios: Racial Capitalism, Revolution and the Problem of Latinidad in Hispano-American Newspapers in Paris and New York City, 1852-1856.” This book examines how three Spanish-language newspapers built on their contributors’ experience of the revolutionary energies, insights and missteps of two revolutions, the anticolonial and antislavery Ladder Rebellion in Cuba (1843-44) and the republican European insurgencies of 1848 to think through the possibilities and limitations of Latinidad in relation to racial capitalism and empire in writings focusing on culture, economic activities and everyday life.

David Luis-Brown is an associate professor in the Cultural Studies and English Departments at Claremont Graduate University. His research specializations include hemispheric Americas studies, Latino/a/x studies, black diaspora studies, and American literature and culture in general. He is the author of Waves of Decolonization: Discourses of Race and Hemispheric Citizenship in Cuba, Mexico and the United States (Duke University Press, 2008). Luis-Brown is working on two books: a critical edition and translation of Andrés Avelino de Orihuela’s Cuban 1854 antislavery novel, El Sol de Jesús del Monte, under submission at a university press; and Blazing at Midnight: Slave Rebellion and Social Identity in Cuban and U.S. Culture. One of the chief aims of Blazing at Midnight is to assess techniques of social categorization in predisciplinary social science, travel narratives, novels, periodicals, and visual culture.

You can download the poster for the event here.