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May 8 – Periodicals and Globalization (Workshop) 🗓

May 8 – Periodicals and Globalization (Workshop) 🗓

Research Group “Transnational Periodical Cultures”

Periodicals and Globalization (Workshop V)

May 8, 2019, 9:45 a.m.-6 p.m., Campus Germersheim (Raum 117, Sitzungsraum)

The research group “Transnational Periodical Cultures” (Jutta Ernst, Dagmar von Hoff, Bjørn von Rimscha, Oliver Scheiding) holds a series of workshops on the following dates:

May 8, 2019 – Workshop V – Periodicals and Globalization
June 5, 2019 – Workshop VI  – Translation and Transnational Periodical Cultures
June 26, 2019 – Doktorandenworkshop – Aktuelle Theorie- und Methodenprobleme der Zeitschriftenforschung

You can find the program for the event on May 8, 2019 here.

If you are interested in attending one of the workshops or specific talks, please contact one of the organizers mentioned above.

For further information, please visit www.transnationalperiodicalcultures.net.

May 7 – Pluralism and Populism: The Legacy of May 68 🗓

May 7 – Pluralism and Populism: The Legacy of May 68 🗓

Walter Benn Michaels
(University of Illinois, Chicago)

May 7, 2019
4 p.m.-6 noon, Philosophicum I, P207

The subject of this talk will be the death of both the author and the working class, with a particular focus on Didier Eribon’s Retour a Reims.

Walter Benn Michaels is a Professor of American Literature and Literary Theory at the University of Illinois, Chicago. Michaels’s work has generated a set of arguments and questions around a host of issues that are central to literary studies: problems of culture and race, identities national and personal, the difference between memory and history, disagreement and difference, and meaning and intention in interpretation. He earned his Ph.D. in 1975 from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Michaels also taught at the Johns Hopkins University and the University of California, Berkeley.

You can download the poster for the event here.

May 15 – The Image of America in pre-revolutionary France (1763-1789): A New Look at Prize-Winning Contests in French Académies 🗓

May 15 – The Image of America in pre-revolutionary France (1763-1789): A New Look at Prize-Winning Contests in French Académies 🗓

Bertrand van Ruymbeke (Université Paris 8)

May 15, 2019
10 a.m.-12 noon, N3 (Muschel)

How did the image of the New World evolve in France from the end of the Seven Years’ War in 1763 to the French Revolution in 1789? What was the intellectual and constitutional impact of the American revolution on pre-revolutionary French society? An original way to answer these two related questions is to look at prize-winning contests (concours) offered by the Académies. These contests were immensely popular in eighteenth-century France as several hundreds were organized, drawing thousands of memoirs over the course of the century. These essay contests bore on a wide range of topics in science, agriculture, history, law, medicine, commerce, gambling, fashion, and geography, as well as a myriad of regional issues, but also on the Atlantic World, slavery, the European «discovery» of the New World, the American revolution, colonization, and trade, particularly in the Académies of Pau, Lyon, Marseille, Toulouse, and Paris. Eloges competitions on major figures, historical or contemporaneous, related to New Worlds, such as Columbus, Franklin, Vergennes or Cook, were also held in the Académies of Marseille, Amiens, Cap François (on the island of Saint-Domingue), and Paris. Memoirs submitted to these contests, along with pamphlets, press articles, travel accounts, compilations of translated State Constitutions, and history books published on the American Revolution, offer a privileged view into a French—and to some extent European­—collective reflection on the colonization of the New World and the birth of the American republic.

Bertrand van Ruymbeke is Professeur de Civilisation et d’Histoire Américaines at the Département d’Études des Pays Anglophones at Université Paris 8.

You can download the poster for the event here.

Obama Institute @ JGU Open Day 2019

Obama Institute @ JGU Open Day 2019

As part of the university-wide open day on Jan 30, 2019, Dr. Nele Sawallisch, Dr. Damien Schlarb, and Julia Velten, M.A. (together with our student assistants Ana Elisa Gomez Laris and Amina Touzos) welcomed high school students to the Obama Institute and introduced them to the opportunities and study programs available here. Over coffee and cookies, the prospective undergraduates were able to engage with staff members and lecturers and got an impression of what studying English or American Studies at the Obama Institute has in store, from possible research topics to career options.

Feb 8 – Pomo Feminist: Serious, Funny and Unhinged Performances by a Former Sacred Naked Nature Girl 🗓

Feb 8 – Pomo Feminist: Serious, Funny and Unhinged Performances by a Former Sacred Naked Nature Girl 🗓

Denise Uyehara (Performance Artist)

February 8, 2019
10 a.m.-12 noon, P 103 (Philosophicum)

 

Denise Uyehara was supposed to be a “good girl” from the suburbs, but instead she turned out “bad.” What went wrong — or right — depends on who you ask. In her talk, she describes work at Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica, exploring her Okinawan and Japanese heritage and U.S. military occupation, performance as 1/4 of the Sacred Naked Nature Girls, Shooting Columbus, and forthcoming adventures.

Denise Uyehara is an interdisciplinary performance artist, interested in telling a story by any means necessary.
www.deniseuyehara.com

You can download the poster for the event here.