Jan 13-Feb 3 – Student Lecture Series: American Slavery in Film 🗓

Jan 13-Feb 3 – Student Lecture Series: American Slavery in Film 🗓

January/February 2023
Fridays, 10:15-11:45
P1 (Philosophicum)

Screening the Past – American Slavery in Film

Students and faculty are invited to a student lecture series on cinematic representations of slavery in recent American feature films, Fridays, 10:15-11:45 in lecture hall P1 (Philosophicum).
Historical films on slavery such as 12 Years a Slave provide fictionalized accounts of historical events and introduce audiences to the experiences of enslaved individuals in the past. In this series of student lectures, presenters will investigate significant and/or contentious aspects of a film’s reconstruction of slavery and its history.

This series is part of Dr. Frank Obenland’s course Cultural Studies VI “Screening the Past – American Slavery in Film”. If you have further questions about the event, please contact Dr. Frank Obenland.

Fri, Jan 13
10:15-11:45, Lecture Hall P1 (Philosophicum)
Georgia Conti and Tobias WaĂźmund
Amistad (1997) – Spielberg’s Representation of Slave Rebellion and the Middle Passage

Only very few major Hollywood films on the history of slavery have directed their focus beyond the United States. One such film is Stephen Spielberg’s retelling of the Amistad Rebellion, a cinematic representation of the often forgotten horrors of the middle passage. In this lecture, we will examine how Amistad (1997) tells a historical story of resistance and generational trauma.

Fri, Jan 20
10:15-11:45, Lecture Hall P1 (Philosophicum)
Frederica Hrdina and Jonas Salz
12 Years a Slave (2013) as Cinematic (Neo-)Slave Narrative

Steve McQueen’s 12 Years a Slave retells the story of a free Black man who was kidnapped from the North and sold into slavery. An adaptation of Solomon Northup’s autobiographical slave narrative, McQueen’s movie depicts the horrors of the daily life of an African American slave. While many films on slavery fail to provide a realistic portrayal of slavery, 12 Years a Slave introduces the first-hand experience of Solomon Northup’s original narrative to a contemporary audience.

Fri, Jan 27
10:15-11:45, Lecture Hall P1 (Philosophicum)
Amé Beert and Milosz Zbikowski
History as Biopic: The Underground Railroad and Fugitive Slaves in Harriet (2019)

Harriet (2019) is the first mainstream production about the life of former slave and female abolitionist Harriet Tubman. For historical films – and in this case a biopic – it is always hard to decide between staying true to history or prioritizing historical education or offering captivating entertainment. That is why in this lecture we will examine the changes to the historical events in Harriet and how they help to shed light on the historical reality of the Underground Railroad and fugitive slaves.

Fri, Feb 3
10:15-11:45, Lecture Hall P1 (Philosophicum)
Elias Apel and Milena Traumann
Memory and Trauma – The Psychological Effects of Slavery in Beloved (1998)

The cinematic adaptation of Toni Morrison’s novel Beloved does not so much bring a realistic depiction of the living conditions and dehumanization of the enslaved to the screen. It rather explores the traumatic character of remembering slavery and bondage. This lecture will discuss Beloved as an exceptional example for the cinematic portrayal of slavery by discussing the story of Sethe and her family, and the ways their past continues to affect them individually and in their relationships.

You can download the poster for this talk here.

Dec 6 – Guest Lecture “Selling Out Your Art” đź—“

Dec 6 – Guest Lecture “Selling Out Your Art” đź—“

Associate Professor Ian Afflerbach

(University of North Georgia, USA)

 

“Selling Out Your Art”

 

December 6, 2022, 4:15pm, 02-611 (GFG)

What does it mean to say that an artist has “sold out”? Where did this expression come from, and why has it gained such widespread currency? This talk explores the history of “selling out,” which emerges as a cultural anxiety during the Gilded Age, when Americans began to worry that personal success and financial gain might come at a moral cost. We will see how “selling out” spread from the realm of “high” art in the late nineteenth century, to popular art forms like punk rock and hip-hop today.

You can download the poster for this talk here.

Ian Afflerbach is Associate Professor of American Literature at the University of North Georgia, where his research and teaching focus on the history of ideas, modernist studies, African American literature, and popular periodicals. He recently completed his first book, Making Liberalism New (Johns Hopkins 2021) and has begun work on a second project—a cultural history of “selling out” in modern America.

Nov 22 – Guest Lecture Germersheim: “Margaret Atwood’s Venture into Graphic Novels” đź—“

Nov 22 – Guest Lecture Germersheim: “Margaret Atwood’s Venture into Graphic Novels” đź—“

Prof. Dr. Brigitte Johanna Glaser (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen)

November 22, 2022, 9:40am, N.106 (Stufenhörsaal)

“Margaret Atwood’s Venture into Graphic Novels: The Angel Catbird Trilogy and the War Bears Series”

 

Professor Glaser’s research focus is in Canadian Studies, Globalization and Transcultural Literature, Postcolonial Studies as well as 18th-Century Literature and Culture. Her publications include the co- edited volumes Shifting Grounds: Cultural Tectonics along the Pacific Rim (2020) and Transgressions / Transformations: Literature and Beyond (2018). Since February 2021, she has been the president of the Association for Canadian Studies in German-Speaking Countries.

 

You can download the poster for this talk here.

Nov 24 – Obama Lecture with Obama Dissertation Prize & Galinsky Prize 🗓

Nov 24 – Obama Lecture with Obama Dissertation Prize & Galinsky Prize 🗓

Nov. 24, 2022 – 11:00-13.00 – Obama Lecture – Dekanatssaal (ReWi, 03-150)

Please join us for our annual Obama Lecture on Thanksgiving, where we will celebrate 70 years of American Studies at JGU Mainz, with contributions from three professors who helped shape what has eventually become the Obama Institute. In addition, we will learn more about the current management of the USA library collection and award the Obama Dissertation Prize as well as the Galinsky Prize for outstanding student theses.

Everyone is welcome!

Please see the flyer below for details.

June 14 – Online Guest Lecture: “Imagining the Indo-Pacific—U.S. Regional Vision and Politics” 🗓

June 14 – Online Guest Lecture: “Imagining the Indo-Pacific—U.S. Regional Vision and Politics” 🗓

Wade Turvold

Daniel K. Inouye Asia Pacific Center for Security Studies, Honolulu, Hawaiʻi

June 14, 2022, 6pm–7:30pm (s.t.)., online via Zoom. Access the event here.

Meeting-ID: 894 5748 9483
Code: 185247

Image of Wade TurvoldDuring the last decade, the U.S. has reinforced its diplomatic, economic, and military approach to the Asia-Pacific region. In accordance with the foreign policy rhetoric of partners like Japan and Australia, the Trump administration eventually published the U.S. “Free and Open Indo-Pacific Vision” (FOIP) in 2019. Since then, FOIP and its principles serve as guideline for U.S. regional policies in the Indo-Pacific, informed by its international agenda of promoting free navigation in maritime spaces and adherence to the existing international rules-based order.
Whereas some critics argue that the implementation of FOIP was a reactionary move to contain China’s ambitions in the region, the prevalent narrative in the discourse on regional security suggests that the rhetorical shift in U.S. diplomacy toward a “Free and Open Indo-Pacific” should be considered in the wider context of globalization and the complex mechanisms of economic and national security interests.
Based on his professional experiences as academic instructor and former Captain of the U.S. Navy, Wade Turvold explains the principles and interests implicated by the U.S. “Free and Open Indo- Pacific” vision, and puts it into perspective with contemporary dynamics of the region

Wade Turvold is a retired U.S. Navy Captain and current faculty member of the Daniel K. Inouye Asia Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu. He graduated with Merit from the U.S. Naval Academy (MD) in 1989 (B.Sc.), and with Distinction from the U.S. Naval War College (RI) in 2000 (M.A.). Mr. Turvold’s expertise covers issues of maritime security, strategy, national security and military operations. He served two educational assignments at the U.S. Army War College and Defence Academy (UK), and has extensive experience in the fields of security, operation and command as Naval Flight Officer. He completed numerous deployments throughout his career to the Indo-Pacific region, the Middle East, and to Europe, and participated in combat operations in Somalia, Kosovo, Iraq, Afghanistan and the Philippines.

You can download the poster for this talk here.

May 24 – Lunch Lecture on Narrative Medicine 🗓

May 24 – Lunch Lecture on Narrative Medicine 🗓

Danielle Spencer

Academic Director, Narrative Medicine Program Columbia University, New York

May 24, 2022, 12-1 p.m., 02.102 (Philo II)

This talk offers an introduction to Narrative Medicine, as well as the concept of metagnosis as the revelation of a longstanding condition. This can occur when an individual is diagnosed with a condition such as ADHD or Asperger Syndrome which was previously present, but undiagnosed; it can also happen when diagnostic boundaries shift. How do these experiences change our knowledge? We will also discuss broader applications of the concept, and ways in which it illuminates the principles and practices of Narrative Medicine.

www.daniellespencer.com/metagnosis

Danielle Spencer is the author of Metagnosis: Revelatory Narratives of Health and Identity (Oxford University Press, 2021) and co-author of Perkins- Prize-winning The Principles and Practice of Narrative Medicine (OUP, 2017). Her research interests include retrospective diagnosis, contemporary film and bioethics, and healthcare pedagogy; her creative and scholarly work appears in diverse outlets, from Ploughshares to The Lancet. Formerly artist/musician David Byrne’s Art Director, Spencer holds a B.A. from Yale University, an M.S. in Narrative Medicine from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. from Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz. She is a 2019 MacDowell Fellow and a 2022 Yaddo Fellow.

You can download the poster for this talk here.