June 19 – Student/Alumni Meet & Greet 🗓

June 19 – Student/Alumni Meet & Greet 🗓

Student/Alumni Meet & Greet

Wednesday, June 19

5 pm in P 110 (Philosophicum)

 

The OI will be hosting an informal first meet & greet for students and alumni of American Studies and cordially invites all students of the BA and MA programs to connect with each other and our alumni. This is your chance to talk about possible careers after finishing an American Studies program and ask any question you might have on how to make the most of your degree and ambitions.

Three alumnae of American Studies at JGU will speak about their jobs and their working experiences to students interested in finding out more about opportunities and perspectives for American Studies graduates.

You can download the poster for the event here.

Watch out for news about future alumni events and stay in touch!

Contact
Dr. Julia Velten
Dr. Sonja Georgi

 

June 18 – Guest Lecture “Imagining Otherwise: Indigenous Futurisms in Andrea L. Rogers’ _Man Made Monsters_” 🗓

June 18 – Guest Lecture “Imagining Otherwise: Indigenous Futurisms in Andrea L. Rogers’ _Man Made Monsters_” 🗓

Vanessa Evans
(Appalachian State University)

“Imagining Otherwise: Indigenous Futurisms in Andrea L. Rogers’ Man Made Monsters

June 18, 2024, 12:15pm, P 103 (Philosophicum)

 

Cherokee writer and scholar Daniel Heath Justice tells us that to live otherwise, we must first imagine otherwise (156). Taking Justice’s claim seriously, this presentation considers how Andrea L. Rogers’ (Cherokee) short story “An Old-Fashioned Girl,” from her collection Man Made Monsters, (re)imagines Cherokee removal through fantasy and horror genre conventions. In this way, Rogers’ story functions as a work of Indigenous futurism(s) that contributes to the renewal, recovery, and extension of Indigenous peoples’ voices and traditions (Dillon 1–2).

 

Vanessa Evans (she/her) is a settler scholar and Assistant Professor of Indigenous Literatures at Appalachian State University in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. Her current monograph project investigates how contemporary Indigenous novels from North America, Oceania, and South Asia represent Indigenous resurgence. This research makes a case for the essential value of comparative, cross-cultural frameworks by reading trans-Indigenously across literary constellations of coresistance comprised of novels from seemingly disparate Indigenous nations. Vanessa’s recent essays appear or are forthcoming in Studies in the Novel (2022), The International Journal of Online Pedagogy and Course Design (2022), and Mapping World Anglophone Studies: English in a World of Strangers (2024). A co-edited collection with Mita Banerjee entitled Cultures of Citizenship in the Twenty-First Century: Literary and Cultural Perspectives on a Legal Concept was published with Transcript in early 2024. Vanessa is also a Co-Managing Editor for the Journal of Transnational American Studies.

 

You can download the poster for the event here.

 

June 19-22 – Conference: The Indian Citizenship Act at 100: Indigenous Rights, Indigenous Futures 🗓

June 19-22 – Conference: The Indian Citizenship Act at 100: Indigenous Rights, Indigenous Futures 🗓

The Indian Citizenship Act at 100:
Indigenous Rights, Indigenous Futures

Conference

June 19-22, 2024
University of Bordeaux-Montaigne, France

Together with the University of Bordeaux-Montaigne, the Virginia Commonwealth University, and the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, the Obama Institute is hosting an international conference on the centenary of the Indian Citizenship Act in Bordeaux, France.

Current and former members of the Obama Institute will chair panels and present papers amongst a large group of internationally renowned Indigenous Studies scholars. Check out and download the complete program here or visit the conference web page here.

If you would like to find out more about the event or specific conference content, please contact Prof. Dr. Oliver Scheiding or Frank Newton.

June 18 – Guest Lecture “Quiet Money: The Family Fortune that Transformed New York, the American Southwest, and the Modern Middle East” 🗓

June 18 – Guest Lecture “Quiet Money: The Family Fortune that Transformed New York, the American Southwest, and the Modern Middle East” 🗓

Katherine Benton-Cohen
(Georgetown University)

“Quiet Money: The Family Fortune that Transformed New York, the American Southwest, and the Modern Middle East”

June 18, 2024, 4:15pm, Fakultätssaal (01-185, Philosophicum)

In this talk Professor Benton-Cohen examines the global impact of the Phelps-Dodge family and copper mining empire over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries. The history of the extended Phelps-Dodge family and their giant copper-mining corporation reveals a social, environmental, and labor history of global capitalism and philanthropy. PD (as it was known by its employees in its many company towns) was one of the US’s most important copper mining companies, until the largest mining merger in history, with the gold-mining company Freeport McMoRan in 2006. The extended Dodge family’s wealth and influence connect places and people seemingly worlds apart—the US-Mexico “copper borderlands”; the elite institutions of the Ivy League and New York; and US influence in the Middle East. Yet little is known of these connections, thanks to the alienation of labor and wealth, and the understated manner of the Dodges. In this talk, Benton-Cohen will discuss in particular the company’s influence on Arizona and how it used its “quiet money” to spread its influence.

Katherine Benton-Cohen is professor and director of doctoral studies in the department of history at Georgetown University. She is the author of Inventing the Immigration Problem: The Dillingham Commission and Its Legacy (Harvard, 2018) and Borderline Americans: Racial Division and Labor War in the Arizona Borderlands (Harvard, 2009). She also served as historical advisor to the nonfiction feature film Bisbee ’17 , winner of the American Historical Association’s O’Connor 2019 prize for best documentary film. Benton-Cohen has held fellowships from Princeton Library, the New York Public Library, American Philosophical Society, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and elsewhere, and has been a visiting scholar at Chuo University in Tokyo. She has appeared in a variety of media outlets including “Matter of Fact with Soledad O’Brien,” the BBC, NPR, and PBS American Experience. She is an OAH Distinguished Lecturer, on the Board of Modern American History, and on the Scholarly Advisory Council for the Wisconsin Historical Society. Benton-Cohen is currently writing a global history of the Phelps-Dodge copper-mining family, whose capitalist and philanthropic links between New York, the US-Mexico Borderlands, and the Middle East profoundly changed each region.

You can download the poster for the event here.

June 6 – Guest Lecture “Reading Resurgence: Contemporary Indigenous Novels as Constellations of Coresistance” 🗓

June 6 – Guest Lecture “Reading Resurgence: Contemporary Indigenous Novels as Constellations of Coresistance” 🗓

Vanessa Evans
(Appalachian State University)

“Reading Resurgence: Contemporary Indigenous Novels as Constellations of Coresistance”

June 6, 2024, 18:15pm, P 109a (Philosophicum)

As settler countries contend with the complexity of Indigenous sovereignty and land-back movements, reconciliation, and the fallout from colonial schools, the relevance of Indigenous resurgence is rising on a global scale. This presentation considers how contemporary Indigenous novels from seemingly disparate Indigenous nations in North America, Oceania, and South Asia represent resurgence: the everyday practices that seek to regenerate and re-establish Indigenous nations (Simpson 2017). Accordingly, this research asks: what do literary representations of resurgence reveal about how diverse Indigenous contexts are (re)imagining Indigenous worlds? What might be gained by a comparative approach grounded in the understanding that distant contexts and peoples are connected and responsible to one another?

Vanessa Evans (she/her) is a settler scholar and Assistant Professor of Indigenous Literatures at Appalachian State University in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. Her current monograph project investigates how contemporary Indigenous novels from North America, Oceania, and South Asia represent Indigenous resurgence. This research makes a case for the essential value of comparative, cross-cultural frameworks by reading trans-Indigenously across literary constellations of coresistance comprised of novels from seemingly disparate Indigenous nations. Vanessa’s recent essays appear or are forthcoming in Studies in the Novel (2022), The International Journal of Online Pedagogy and Course Design (2022), and Mapping World Anglophone Studies: English in a World of Strangers (2024). A co-edited collection with Mita Banerjee entitled Cultures of Citizenship in the Twenty-First Century: Literary and Cultural Perspectives on a Legal Concept was published with Transcript in early 2024. Vanessa is also a Co-Managing Editor for the Journal of Transnational American Studies.

You can download the poster for the event here.