Dec 13 – Leaving the Land Before Time: The Planetary Presence of Indigenous World Literatures 🗓

Dec 13 – Leaving the Land Before Time: The Planetary Presence of Indigenous World Literatures 🗓

Vanessa Evans (York University, Canada)

December 13, 2018, 12-1 p.m., 02.102 (Philo II)

 

Too often, the pull of the policy audience has resulted in decolonization being enlisted as a hollow metaphor that seeks to reconcile settler complicity and secure settler futurity. This seduction has immense consequences for the substance, style, and politics of research in Indigenous studies. As such, the field of Indigenous literary study cannot blindly adopt the agendas of those making or administering policy. I advocate that a primary impediment to an increased consciousness about Indigeneity lies in how we study the contemporary literature of Indigenous peoples. This requires a reconceptualization of Indigeneity away from its boundedness to specific lands and pasts that valorize ties to first contact, instead embracing the reality that Indigenous peoples are a contemporary presence throughout the world. In response to this reimagining, my research investigates: (i) how the study of Indigenous world literatures might destabilize characterizations of absence that isolate Indigenous peoples to particular places and pasts, and (ii) how these literatures can entrench Indigenous presence as planetary phenomenon. I make this intervention by modeling a cosmic methodology that recognizes Indigeneity and Indigenous peoples as omnipresent and thriving; it is, at its heart, a project that contributes to the ongoing work of decolonizing literary study itself through the minds of those who study and teach literature.

Vanessa Evans is a doctoral candidate in the Department of English at York University. She holds a B.A. in English from the University of Calgary and an M.Litt. in Modernities from the University of Glasgow. Vanessa is currently a visiting lecturer at the Obama Institute for Transnational American Studies at JGU Mainz.

You can download the poster for this talk here.

June 21 – March Madness, Mascots, and Milkshake Ducks: A Social Psychological Perspective on Reactions to Sister Jean 🗓

June 21 – March Madness, Mascots, and Milkshake Ducks: A Social Psychological Perspective on Reactions to Sister Jean 🗓

Scott P. King (Shenandoah University, USA)

June 21, 2018, 1-2.30 p.m., 02.102 (Philo II)

 

Sister Jean Dolores-Schmidt, a 98-year-old nun and team chaplain for Loyola University Chicago, became a sensation in both social and traditional media during her school’s underdog run to the 2018 USA collegiate men’s basketball tournament semifinals. In this presentation, I examine her rise in popularity, and subsequent backlash to that popularity, through the lens of social psychological theories on aging and stereotypes, using Twitter as a basis for qualitative analysis.

Scott King is Associate Professor of Psychology at Shenandoah University in Winchester, Virginia, USA and Visiting Lecturer in the Obama Institute at JGU Mainz.

 

You can download the poster for this talk here.

June 19 – Encountering Pictures:  Materiality, Conceptualist Photography, and the Subject 🗓

June 19 – Encountering Pictures: Materiality, Conceptualist Photography, and the Subject 🗓

Julia Polyck-O’Neill (Brock University, Canada)

June 19, 2018, 12-2 p.m., 02.102 (Philo II)

 

The idea that artistic practice, after the massive shifts initiated by conceptual art, takes into account, and is accountable to, the material reality of human relations suggests a radical reconceptualization of art’s social, cultural, economic, and political position and role. According to this reading, I consider how conceptualist photography has the capacity to contribute to such considerations to an even greater degree, by means of the visual-cognitive dynamics inherent to the photographic encounter. With its unique epistemological and ontological bearing, such an encounter has the potential to proffer a significant phenomenological intervention: one that uses both evidential and abstract-conceptual information to simultaneously promote deep reflection and propose new perceptions of the world in relation to the self. In comparatively analyzing Canadian artist Jeff Wall’s primary strategies in staging photographic images, I uncover how historic and more recent theoretical and philosophical discussions and material practices in photography emerge from and import specific but variable sets of relations that effectively participate in the construction of subjectivity according to both individual and collective scales.

Julia Polyck-O‘Neill is an artist, curator, critic, and writer, and is a doctoral candidate in the Interdisciplinary Humanities program (Culture and Aesthetics) at Brock University (St Catharines, Ontario, Canada) and Visiting Lecturer in the Obama Institute at JGU Mainz.

You can download the poster for this talk here.