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Safety update re: Contacting faculty and staff 🗓

Safety update re: Contacting faculty and staff 🗓

Dear Students,

Because of the current situation, we have to change our policies regarding personal consultations during walk-in office hours. We are to minimize personal contact with our students; consequently,

  • Most office hours will be suspended until further notice.
  • If you have specific requests, contact us via e-mail and state the exact purpose of your enquiry.
    Provide a phone number for complex issues that require clarification; the primary source of contact will be e-mail though.

Thank you and take care!

DFG funds new project: “Periodicals and Indigenous Modernity” 🗓

DFG funds new project: “Periodicals and Indigenous Modernity” 🗓

Periodicals and Indigenous Modernity

The German Research Foundation (DFG) has announced to fund the research project “Periodicals and Indigenous Modernity: Building a Text Corpus of American Indian Magazines,1890–1930” (SCHE 1616/12-1) conducted by Professor Scheiding and Frank Newton, M.A. during a three-year funding period (2020–2023). This research project examines Native American periodicals and how they function as particular media formats to shape society and culture in a transitional period. The project seeks to find out more about what makes Native American periodicals a powerful middle ground to affect the wider culture and mediate various types of indigenous modernity. The project is part of the Mainz-based research initiative Transnational Periodical Cultures.

Aug 10-14 – OI Summer School in Oklahoma: Native American Culture, Law, and Film 🗓

Aug 10-14 – OI Summer School in Oklahoma: Native American Culture, Law, and Film 🗓

Aug 10-14, 2020
The University of Oklahoma
Norman, Oklahoma, USA

In August 2020, the Obama Institute for Transnational American Studies offers a Summer School to Norman, Oklahoma. Join us for workshop sessions on Indigenous filmmaking with directors and faculty from the University of Oklahoma’s American Indian Law and Film Studies Institutes, on field trips to tribal communities, law courts, schools, and indigenous cultural heritage centers, and experience on-campus life in a student residence hall.

For further information and registration, please contact Dr. Sonja Georgi.

You can download the poster for the event here.

Feb 6 – The Legacy of Residential Schools in Native North American Literature and Culture: Pedagogical and Theoretical Considerations 🗓

Feb 6 – The Legacy of Residential Schools in Native North American Literature and Culture: Pedagogical and Theoretical Considerations 🗓

Cristina Stanciu (Virginia Commonwealth University, USA)

Feb 6, 2020
16:15-17:45, P 203 (Philosophicum)

This presentation, part of a new research project on Indigenous writing in the aftermath of residential schools in four settler states, has two interrelated goals: first, to think about the possibilities and limitations of writing/literature about traumatic experiences by residential school survivors and their children in North America in both theoretical and pedagogical terms;  second, to interrogate the politics of settler-colonial uses of images of indigenous children in boarding and residential schools in the US and Canada. Part of a larger settler-colonial project of elimination through education, boarding and residential schools aimed to “kill the Indian and save the man” (US) and to “kill the Indian in the child” (Canada). Of the 150,000 Aboriginal children who attended residential schools in Canada between 1876 and 1996, 6,000 are documented to have died of malnutrition, disease, physical abuse, and suicide. Many others lived to tell their stories, surviving the imprint of what Patrick Wolf has called “total institutions,” and giving voice to that painful history. As early as the 1880s, Native children in US boarding schools were writing for the student papers; twentieth and twenty-first century survivors continued to write about residential schools in genres from autobiography and poetry to drama and the novel. Despite the saturation of “Indian”-inflected images in settler colonial representations, Indigenous and First Nations people in North America are still, for the most part, invisible. As Maori scholar Linda T. Smith has argued, Indigenous communities have struggled for centuries to exercise a fundamental right: “to represent ourselves.” In the last three decades, indigenous artists have engaged in what Michelle Raheja calls visual sovereignty, the creative self-representation of Native artists, turning the archival absence into presence. I end with a case study– The exhibit “the Legacy of Hope,” which traveled to major TRC events, displayed photographic and documentary evidence along with transcribed testimony to raise awareness about the legacy of residential schools nationally. The coherent pictorial and textual narrative of the exhibit—supplementing recorded survivor testimonies, some broadcasted live—tells a story of survival and resilience Besides pointing to a traumatic past—rooted in the loss of family, language, culture, and often hope—they gesture towards re-visioning a national narrative by imagining a resilient future.

Cristina Stanciu is Associate Professor in the Departement of English at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, USA and Fulbright Scholar 2019-20. Her research interests include Ethnic and immigrant American literatures, American Indian studies, visual culture (esp. silent film), and critical theory.

 

You can download the poster for the event here.

Feb 4 – Native Education, Print Culture, and Americanization at Carlisle Indian Industrial School, 1879-1918 🗓

Feb 4 – Native Education, Print Culture, and Americanization at Carlisle Indian Industrial School, 1879-1918 🗓

Cristina Stanciu (Virginia Commonwealth University, USA)

Feb 4, 2020
16:15-17:45, Fakultätssaal (Philosophicum)

This talk turns to print culture, zooming in on a key archive: the records of Carlisle Indian Industrial School, the first federally-funded off-reservation boarding school started in 1879 in Carlisle, PA. I argue that print culture—although part and parcel of the settler colonial project—enabled Native students to think, dream, and act toward a present and future beyond the confines of their (forced) industrial education. Examining surviving student writings, letters, and publications at Carlisle Indian Industrial School and several other federal boarding schools, I argue that Indigenous students’ work in print and epistolary form offers a glimpse into a tumultuous period of forced assimilation and Americanization, where student involvement in writing and reading practices mitigated some of the damage that industrial training did to Native education. Competing visions for Native education and print culture shaped this key period in the American Indian intellectual tradition, when emerging writers, editors, lawyers, and politicians started a print debate over American citizenship in the publications of Carlisle Indian School. Revealing editorial intervention and control of the students’ narratives in pamphlets, letters, student files, and the Carlisle magazines, I read student writing as complicit with the institution’s ideology, popularized by the school’s founder, R.H. Pratt, and yet critical of the very demands that the institution made of its students. Education for Americanization aimed to erase tribal identity and instill patriotism in students; yet, Native students integrated indigeneity into their writing and expressive culture at Carlisle in subtle ways. Although the authorship of the students’ writings is often difficult to ascertain, given the controlled environment in which they lived and wrote, as well as the constraints of colonial archives in collecting, preserving, and curating materials produced by Native students, this archive is worth studying for its contributions to what Osage critic Robert Warrior calls the American Indian Intellectual tradition. Following Warrior, in this chapter I read what he calls “Native educational texts”—a category where I also include the writings of students—a “microcosm of Native literary history,” a necessary point of departure not only for understanding how students negotiated Americanization in print, but also for our critical conceptualization of Native American written tradition as part of a continuum. Ultimately, I argue, the beginnings of the boarding school experiment and the removal of Native children to these institutions starting in 1879 coincided with the beginning of modern American Indian intellectual history, as well as the emergence of the first generation of intertribal activists and scholars.

Cristina Stanciu is Associate Professor in the Departement of English at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, USA and Fulbright Scholar 2019-20. Her research interests include Ethnic and immigrant American literatures, American Indian studies, visual culture (esp. silent film), and critical theory.

 

You can download the poster for the event here.

Jan 31 – History Reloaded? Eternal Girlhood and the Afterlives of Annie Oakley 🗓

Jan 31 – History Reloaded? Eternal Girlhood and the Afterlives of Annie Oakley 🗓

Stefanie Schäfer

Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

Jan 31, 2020
08:15-09:45, P 206 (Philosophicum)

This presentation examines the influence of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West on the Western genre and zooms in on the gendered representation of cowboy culture by female sharpshooter Annie Oakley, who became a star in her own right in the course of the 20th century. It analyzes Oakley’s girlhood performance and her transformations in the film version of the muscial smash hit Annie Get Your Gun (1946/1950) and in the 2004 Disney film Hidalgo.

PD Dr. Stefanie Schäfer is assistant professor of American Studies at FSU Jena. Stefanie Schäfer’s work centers on iconographies of power and on gendered figurations of the national in the US and Canada. She draws from concepts from Transnational North American Studies, American and Canadian Studies, as well as Popular Culture and Visual Culture.

 

You can download the poster for the event here.