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Jan 31 – History Reloaded? Eternal Girlhood and the Afterlives of Annie Oakley 🗓

Jan 31 – History Reloaded? Eternal Girlhood and the Afterlives of Annie Oakley 🗓

Stefanie Schäfer

Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

Jan 31, 2020
08:15-09:45, P 206 (Philosophicum)

This presentation examines the influence of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West on the Western genre and zooms in on the gendered representation of cowboy culture by female sharpshooter Annie Oakley, who became a star in her own right in the course of the 20th century. It analyzes Oakley’s girlhood performance and her transformations in the film version of the muscial smash hit Annie Get Your Gun (1946/1950) and in the 2004 Disney film Hidalgo.

PD Dr. Stefanie Schäfer is assistant professor of American Studies at FSU Jena. Stefanie Schäfer’s work centers on iconographies of power and on gendered figurations of the national in the US and Canada. She draws from concepts from Transnational North American Studies, American and Canadian Studies, as well as Popular Culture and Visual Culture.

 

You can download the poster for the event here.

Jan 30 – Cowboys All! Settler Colonialism and the Invention of Tradition at the Western Spectacle 🗓

Jan 30 – Cowboys All! Settler Colonialism and the Invention of Tradition at the Western Spectacle 🗓

Stefanie Schäfer

Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

Jan 30, 2020
12:15-13:45, P 6 (Philosophicum)

This presentation takes a look at the staging of settlement history and its transformation into rodeo sports in North America’s biggest Western Spectacles, the Cheyenne Frontier Days (est. 1897) and the Calgary Stampede (est. 1912). It combines a gendered reading of the Western spectacle with a critique of settler colonialist production of “native” traditions of the West and concludes with a look at contemporary rodeo narratives in popular culture.

PD Dr. Stefanie Schäfer is assistant professor of American Studies at FSU Jena. Stefanie Schäfer’s work centers on iconographies of power and on gendered figurations of the national in the US and Canada. She draws from concepts from Transnational North American Studies, American and Canadian Studies, as well as Popular Culture and Visual Culture.

 

You can download the poster for the event here.

December 17 – “Winosburg, Ohio” – Community, Regionalism, and Cultural Mobility in Sherwood Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio (1919) and Donald Ray Pollock’s Knockemstiff (2008) 🗓

December 17 – “Winosburg, Ohio” – Community, Regionalism, and Cultural Mobility in Sherwood Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio (1919) and Donald Ray Pollock’s Knockemstiff (2008) 🗓

Jochen Achilles (University of Würzburg)

December 17, 2019
6–8 p.m., P 103 (Philosophicum I)

Sherwood Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio and Donald Ray Pollock’s Knockemstiff are linked by common structural features as well as cultural concerns. Held side by side, both story cycles illustrate a regional history of downward mobility, as documented in Nancy Isenberg’s White Trash (2016) and J. D. Vance’s Hillbilly Elegy (2016). Phenomena unheard of in turn-of-the-century Winesburg, such as war trauma, dementia, drug addiction, and systemic violence dominate Knockemstiff. In complex ways both story cycles feed into current discussions of critical regionalism (Kenneth Frampton, Klaus Benesch, Klaus Lösch, Heike Paul) cultural mobility (Stephen Greenblatt), slow violence (Rob Nixon), and cruel optimism (Lauren Berlant).

Dec 9 – Info Session: American Studies Summer School 🗓

Dec 9 – Info Session: American Studies Summer School 🗓

Join the American Studies Summer School 2020!

The Civil Rights Movement, Southern Literature, and Southern Food & Music

Experience a unique and intensive research and learning opportunity focusing on the American South. The Obama Institute offers this three-week American Studies Summer School traveling through Arkansas, Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, and Tennessee from the end of July to mid-August. This educational trip provides students with courses in language, literature, and cultural studies. Starting in Little Rock, Arkansas and ending in Washington DC, participants will study the Civil Rights Movement, the history of food and music in the US South, and Southern Literature. They benefit from lectures, readings, and films, as well as on-site learning. Summer School participants can receive course credits in Independent Studies, Cultural Studies, or Written English.

INFO SESSION
Monday, December 9, 2019, 6 p.m., Room P 15
(Philosophicum)

If you cannot come to the info session but are interested in joining,
please contact Julia Velten (juvelten@uni-mainz.de).

You can download the flyer for the info session here.

Nov 28 – Thanksgiving Obama Lecture, Obama Dissertation Prize & Galinsky Memorial Prize 🗓

Nov 28 – Thanksgiving Obama Lecture, Obama Dissertation Prize & Galinsky Memorial Prize 🗓

Nov. 28, 2019 – 10.15 – 12.00 – Dekanatssaal (ReWi, 03-150)

Come join us for the annual Thanksgiving Obama Lecture, where we will hear a lecture by Prof. Dr. Heike Paul from the University of Erlangen-Nürnberg and will give out awards for outstanding undergrad and PhD work.

Please download the flyer here. It includes more details and all information.

 

Obama Lecture

Prof. Dr. Heike Paul (University of Erlangen-Nürnberg)
“Civil Sentimentalism in Contemporary Political and Popular Culture”

 

Obama Dissertation Prize

Dr. Noaquia N. Callahan (University of Iowa)
“Heat of the Day: Mary Church Terrell and African American Feminist Transnational Activism”

 

Hans Galinsky Memorial Prize

Franziska Ottstadt
“The Remediation of American History in Red Dead Redemption 2
Graduate Seminar 512: New Media and Early North America (SoSe 2019)

Robert Udo Dückershoff
“Telling Amontillado from Sherry. Irony and Deceit in Edgar Allan Poe’s ‘The Cask of Amontillado’”
Proseminar 122: 19th Century Classics (SoSe 2019)