June 14 – Online Guest Lecture: “Imagining the Indo-Pacific—U.S. Regional Vision and Politics” 🗓

June 14 – Online Guest Lecture: “Imagining the Indo-Pacific—U.S. Regional Vision and Politics” 🗓

Wade Turvold

Daniel K. Inouye Asia Pacific Center for Security Studies, Honolulu, Hawaiʻi

June 14, 2022, 6pm–7:30pm (s.t.)., online via Zoom. Access the event here.

Meeting-ID: 894 5748 9483
Code: 185247

Image of Wade TurvoldDuring the last decade, the U.S. has reinforced its diplomatic, economic, and military approach to the Asia-Pacific region. In accordance with the foreign policy rhetoric of partners like Japan and Australia, the Trump administration eventually published the U.S. “Free and Open Indo-Pacific Vision” (FOIP) in 2019. Since then, FOIP and its principles serve as guideline for U.S. regional policies in the Indo-Pacific, informed by its international agenda of promoting free navigation in maritime spaces and adherence to the existing international rules-based order.
Whereas some critics argue that the implementation of FOIP was a reactionary move to contain China’s ambitions in the region, the prevalent narrative in the discourse on regional security suggests that the rhetorical shift in U.S. diplomacy toward a “Free and Open Indo-Pacific” should be considered in the wider context of globalization and the complex mechanisms of economic and national security interests.
Based on his professional experiences as academic instructor and former Captain of the U.S. Navy, Wade Turvold explains the principles and interests implicated by the U.S. “Free and Open Indo- Pacific” vision, and puts it into perspective with contemporary dynamics of the region

Wade Turvold is a retired U.S. Navy Captain and current faculty member of the Daniel K. Inouye Asia Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu. He graduated with Merit from the U.S. Naval Academy (MD) in 1989 (B.Sc.), and with Distinction from the U.S. Naval War College (RI) in 2000 (M.A.). Mr. Turvold’s expertise covers issues of maritime security, strategy, national security and military operations. He served two educational assignments at the U.S. Army War College and Defence Academy (UK), and has extensive experience in the fields of security, operation and command as Naval Flight Officer. He completed numerous deployments throughout his career to the Indo-Pacific region, the Middle East, and to Europe, and participated in combat operations in Somalia, Kosovo, Iraq, Afghanistan and the Philippines.

You can download the poster for this talk here.

May 24 – Lunch Lecture on Narrative Medicine 🗓

May 24 – Lunch Lecture on Narrative Medicine 🗓

Danielle Spencer

Academic Director, Narrative Medicine Program Columbia University, New York

May 24, 2022, 12-1 p.m., 02.102 (Philo II)

This talk offers an introduction to Narrative Medicine, as well as the concept of metagnosis as the revelation of a longstanding condition. This can occur when an individual is diagnosed with a condition such as ADHD or Asperger Syndrome which was previously present, but undiagnosed; it can also happen when diagnostic boundaries shift. How do these experiences change our knowledge? We will also discuss broader applications of the concept, and ways in which it illuminates the principles and practices of Narrative Medicine.

www.daniellespencer.com/metagnosis

Danielle Spencer is the author of Metagnosis: Revelatory Narratives of Health and Identity (Oxford University Press, 2021) and co-author of Perkins- Prize-winning The Principles and Practice of Narrative Medicine (OUP, 2017). Her research interests include retrospective diagnosis, contemporary film and bioethics, and healthcare pedagogy; her creative and scholarly work appears in diverse outlets, from Ploughshares to The Lancet. Formerly artist/musician David Byrne’s Art Director, Spencer holds a B.A. from Yale University, an M.S. in Narrative Medicine from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. from Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz. She is a 2019 MacDowell Fellow and a 2022 Yaddo Fellow.

You can download the poster for this talk here.

Research Summer 2022

Research Summer 2022

The Obama Institute for Transnational American Studies welcomes several internationally renowned scholars in the summer term of 2022. Please join us for their contributions to our course and research program!

May 9
2–4pm, P3, Philosophicum I

Imagined Pasts: Historical Thinking and Black Immigrants
Herman L. Bennett,
City University of New York

May 10
2–4pm, 01-6182–4pm, P5, Philosophicum I

Ethnic Formation Now and the Problem with the Past 
Herman L. Bennet, City University of New York

4–6pm, P 205, Philosophicum I

Visual Arts as Research: Examples from the Studio
Ruth Stanford, Georgia State University, Atlanta

May 16
2-4pm, P3, Philosophicum I

Leaving America: Emigrant Culture When the Dream Is Over 
Jeffrey Herlihy-Mera, Universidad de Puerto Rico-Mayagüez 

May 17
10am–12pm, P106, Philosophicum I

Juanita Harrison’s “Great, Wide, Beautiful World”
Cathryn Halverson, Minot State University, North Dakota

2–4pm, P5, Philosophicum I

On the Puertoricanization of U.S. Higher Education
Jeffrey Herlihy-Mera, Universidad de Puerto Rico-Mayagüez

May 24
12–2pm, P207, Philosophicum I

From Lemonade to Homecoming: Beyoncé’s Spatial Politics
Patricia Coloma Peñate, Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia

4–6pm, P205, Philosophicum I

The Phenomenology of Heinrich Sisstrunk: A Portrait of a First Settler in the New World
Patricia Coloma Peñate, Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia

June 13
2–4pm, P3, Philosophicum I

The Muslims Are (Always) Coming!: How Religion as a Category of Analysis Complicates American Immigration Narratives
Moustafa Bayoumi, Brooklyn College, City University of New York

June 14
2–4pm, P5, Philosophicum I

“It don’t Gitmo better than this”: Why Guantanamo Bay May Be the Best Worst Place for Understanding Transnational American Studies
Moustafa Bayoumi, Brooklyn College, City University of New York

6–8pm, Online (Zoom, click here for access) Meeting ID: 894 5748 9483 Code: 185247

U.S. Regional Vision and Politics
Wade Turvold, Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies, Honolulu, Hawai’i

June 15
12–2pm, 14SR01, BKM

Bonds of War: How Civil War Financial Agents Sold the World on the Union
David K. Thomson, Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, Connecticut

You can find a poster overview of all events here.

Jan 27 – Dirk Mönkemöller (“The Weekender”): Aus dem Alltag eines Magazinmachers 🗓

Jan 27 – Dirk Mönkemöller (“The Weekender”): Aus dem Alltag eines Magazinmachers 🗓

Dirk Mönkemöller (The Weekender): Aus dem Alltag eines Magazinmachers

Jan 27, 2022, 12 noon – 1 p.m., Online (Zoom)

Dirk Mönkemöller gibt seit 10 Jahren das Magazin The Weekender heraus. Der freiberufliche Gestalter und Journalist aus Köln ist seit 10 Jahren Co-Herausgeber seiner Zeitschrift und berichtet in seinem Gastvortrag, wie sein Alltag aussieht und lädt anschließend zur Diskussion ein.

https://us06web.zoom.us/j/83657033795?pwd=MmhtYkVvbUtRVkp2N2NpU2lZb05QUT09

Meeting-ID: 836 5703 3795 Kenncode: 397737

Jan 18 – Online ERASMUS Guest Lectures by Patricia Peñate 🗓

Jan 18 – Online ERASMUS Guest Lectures by Patricia Peñate 🗓

Three Online ERASMUS Guest Lectures by Patricia Peñate

Jan 18, 2022

12 noon – 2 p.m.: From Lemonade to Homecoming: Beyoncé’s Spatial Politics (Host: Sonja Georgi)
4 – 6 p.m.: Project Presentation “Sistrunk” with Professor Elizabeth West, Georgia State U (Hosts: Axel Schäfer, Mita Banerjee, Oliver Scheiding)
6 – 8 p.m.: Zora Neale Hurston’s and Lydia Cabrera’s Transcultural Approaches to Conjuring Feminism (Host: Oliver Scheiding)

Access:
For access to the online lectures, please contact the respective lecturers and professors who host Patricia Peñate for her individual lectures.

Patricia Coloma Peñate is an Assistant Professor of English at Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia (Spain). She holds a PhD in English with a specialization in African American and Afro-Cuban literature and folklore, and a certificate in Latin American Studies from Georgia State University (2012). In her research, Dr. Coloma Peñate focuses on African American literature, U.S.  Ethnic and immigration literature. Concretely she interrogates the intersections between space, race, spirituality and female identity. She has published book chapters in New Methodological Approaches to Foreign Language Teaching (2017). The Lemonade Reader (2019) among others, several articles and book reviews.

12 noon – 2 p.m.: From Lemonade to Homecoming: Beyoncé’s Spatial Politics

This talk examines the way in which pop singer Beyoncé has recently employed space in her music videos as a visual  paradigm that centralizes the African American experience in predominantly white enclaves. Such maneuver decentralizes notions of power and agency by also providing a feminist agenda and  a discourse about black is beautiful. Essential in her employment of space is the singer’s celebration of her identity as a black creole woman,  whose sense of self is rooted in an African American intellectual and artistic tradition as well as in her own ancestry.

4 – 6 p.m.: Project Presentation “Sistrunk” with Professor Elizabeth West, Georgia State U)

Patricia Penate contributes to Elizabeth West’s project on “Sistrunk” as Spanish Expert. Together they will talk about and discuss the project.

6 – 8 p.m.: Zora Neale Hurston’s and Lydia Cabrera’s Transcultural Approaches to Conjuring Feminism

This talk examines Hurston’s and Cabrera’s anthropological works from a transcultural perspective. Paying special attention to the way in which these two folklorists portrayed African-based spirituality in its relation to female identity, this talk proposes how they provided an anthropological perspective of what has recently been addressed as ‘conjuring feminism’.

Dec 16: Robopocalypse – Online Guest Lecture and Discussion with Author 🗓

Dec 16: Robopocalypse – Online Guest Lecture and Discussion with Author 🗓

Robopocalypse: Online Author Talk and Discussion

Daniel H. Wilson
(Cherokee | Author and Robotics Engineer, Portland, Oregon)

Dec 16, 18:00, Zoom

Access here:
Thema: Guest Lecture, Daniel H. Wilson
Uhrzeit: 16.Dez..2021 06:00 PM Amsterdam, Berlin, Rom, Stockholm, Wien
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81707743307?pwd=ak9YQmxqMVlKTXdnQXdvY0EzYWw0QT09
Meeting-ID: 817 0774 3307
Kenncode: 332291

Daniel H. Wilson is Cherokee author from Portland, Oregon. He is an award-winning, New York Times best-selling author and robotics engineer. He is the author of Robopocalypse, Amped, and The Clockwork Dynasty, among other publications.

He earned an M.S. in Robotics and in Machine Learning, and a Ph.D. in Robotics in 2005 at the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His thesis work, entitled Assistive Intelligent Environments for Automatic Health Monitoring, focused on providing automatic location and activity monitoring in the home via low-cost sensors such as motion detectors and contact switches. He has worked as a research intern at Microsoft Research, the Xerox PARC, Northrop Grumman, and Intel Research Seattle. Also, he hosted a series on the History Channel entitled The Works, where he explained the hidden workings of everyday items.

In this guest lecture, Daniel H. Wilson is going to talk to us about his novel Robopocalypse. In the near future, a massively powerful artificial intelligence called Archos is created and cannot be contained. In those early months, only a handful of technological glitches are noticed by humans, as Archos starts to take over our cars, aircraft guidance systems, military robots, and computer networks – enslaving the entire global system that runs our lives. Then comes Zero Hour: The robot war suddenly ignites and as all the dazzling technology that runs our world turns against us, the human race is both decimated and for the first time in history, united. In the devastation that follows, humankind must destroy its own civilization to survive.

In the context of contemporary Indigenous Literature, Robopocalypse is revolutionary. It tackles issues of kinship, panhumanism, and indigenous futurism. The latter, employs tropes of science fiction to convey a decolonial narrative. Through techniques such as slipstream, worldbuilding, and First Contact scenarios, Robopocalypse constructs a speculative future that forces the reader to redefine the notion of humanity as such.

Everyone welcome!