Research Summer 2022

Research Summer 2022

The Obama Institute for Transnational American Studies welcomes several internationally renowned scholars in the summer term of 2022. Please join us for their contributions to our course and research program!

May 9
2–4pm, P3, Philosophicum I

Imagined Pasts: Historical Thinking and Black Immigrants
Herman L. Bennett,
City University of New York

May 10
2–4pm, 01-6182–4pm, P5, Philosophicum I

Ethnic Formation Now and the Problem with the Past 
Herman L. Bennet, City University of New York

4–6pm, P 205, Philosophicum I

Visual Arts as Research: Examples from the Studio
Ruth Stanford, Georgia State University, Atlanta

May 16
2-4pm, P3, Philosophicum I

Leaving America: Emigrant Culture When the Dream Is Over 
Jeffrey Herlihy-Mera, Universidad de Puerto Rico-Mayagüez 

May 17
10am–12pm, P106, Philosophicum I

Juanita Harrison’s “Great, Wide, Beautiful World”
Cathryn Halverson, Minot State University, North Dakota

2–4pm, P5, Philosophicum I

On the Puertoricanization of U.S. Higher Education
Jeffrey Herlihy-Mera, Universidad de Puerto Rico-Mayagüez

May 24
12–2pm, P207, Philosophicum I

From Lemonade to Homecoming: Beyoncé’s Spatial Politics
Patricia Coloma Peñate, Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia

4–6pm, P205, Philosophicum I

The Phenomenology of Heinrich Sisstrunk: A Portrait of a First Settler in the New World
Patricia Coloma Peñate, Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia

June 13
2–4pm, P3, Philosophicum I

The Muslims Are (Always) Coming!: How Religion as a Category of Analysis Complicates American Immigration Narratives
Moustafa Bayoumi, Brooklyn College, City University of New York

June 14
2–4pm, P5, Philosophicum I

“It don’t Gitmo better than this”: Why Guantanamo Bay May Be the Best Worst Place for Understanding Transnational American Studies
Moustafa Bayoumi, Brooklyn College, City University of New York

6–8pm, Online (Zoom, link forthcoming)

U.S. Regional Vision and Politics
Wade Turvold, Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies, Honolulu, Hawai’i

June 15
12–2pm, 14SR01, BKM

tba
David K. Thomson, Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, Connecticut

You can find a poster overview of all events here.

“Africans, Americans, and Colonial Germany” Symposium, Apr. 29, 2022

“Africans, Americans, and Colonial Germany” Symposium, Apr. 29, 2022

SYMPOSIUM

Africans, Americans, and Colonial Germany

An online symposium on Zoom (use meeting code 207060)

April 29, 2022

The Obama Institute for Transnational American Studies organizes a symposium on the heritage of Colonial Germany and the presence of people of African descent in German society. This trilateral investigation ranges from Germany to Africa, America and back, addresses the German engagement in the slavery trade and the institution of slavery, the violent effects of colonization still felt on site and visible in the spoils on display in the museums, and the systemic discrimination of Black people. Fellows of the Obama Institute, former and present colleagues will present aspects of their current research involving the relations between Namibia and Germany, the racist treatment of Africans, African Americans and Afro-Germans and the legacy of German colonialism in the Pacific.

We welcome Ruth Stanford (Georgia State University, USA), Heike Raphael-Hernandez (University of Würzburg, Germany), Herman Bennett (City University of New York, USA), Pia Wiegmink (University of Bonn, Germany) and a student presentation by Ahngeli Shivam (University of Mainz, Germany).

Download the poster with program here.

December 17 – “Winosburg, Ohio” – Community, Regionalism, and Cultural Mobility in Sherwood Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio (1919) and Donald Ray Pollock’s Knockemstiff (2008) 🗓

December 17 – “Winosburg, Ohio” – Community, Regionalism, and Cultural Mobility in Sherwood Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio (1919) and Donald Ray Pollock’s Knockemstiff (2008) 🗓

Jochen Achilles (University of Würzburg)

December 17, 2019
6–8 p.m., P 103 (Philosophicum I)

Sherwood Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio and Donald Ray Pollock’s Knockemstiff are linked by common structural features as well as cultural concerns. Held side by side, both story cycles illustrate a regional history of downward mobility, as documented in Nancy Isenberg’s White Trash (2016) and J. D. Vance’s Hillbilly Elegy (2016). Phenomena unheard of in turn-of-the-century Winesburg, such as war trauma, dementia, drug addiction, and systemic violence dominate Knockemstiff. In complex ways both story cycles feed into current discussions of critical regionalism (Kenneth Frampton, Klaus Benesch, Klaus Lösch, Heike Paul) cultural mobility (Stephen Greenblatt), slow violence (Rob Nixon), and cruel optimism (Lauren Berlant).