October 12 – Health Care in America: How, Why, What Next? 🗓

October 12 – Health Care in America: How, Why, What Next? 🗓

William Pierce (APCO Worldwide, former assistant secretary for public affairs, DHHS)

10-11.30a.m., P 105

Among the most developed nations, the United States has a rather unique health care system. The basic question is why?

While often leading in drug discovery, new technologies, and treatments, the U.S. does not have universal coverage. Yet it spends more per capita on health care than all other developed nations but its health indictors do not match spending. Adding to the mystery, many non-US come to America to receive care, especially when they are very sick.

How did the US get here? Come listen and take part in a discussion: “The US Health Care System: How, Why, What Next?” and hear about the political, economic and policy factors that have shaped and will continue to shape the US system.

On cooperation with the Atlantische Akademie.

4th of July Celebration at the Obama Institute

4th of July Celebration at the Obama Institute

As Americans celebrated the 4th of July, so too did the Obama Institute.

Festivities began at noon with a lecture by Dr. David Sirakov, Director of the Atlantic Academy.

Faculty and students were at hand in the afternoon to answer questions about posters showcasing the varied research projects of the institute.

In the evening, Prof. Philipp Gassert, President of the German Association of American Studies and Professor of Contemporary History at the University of Mannheim gave his lecture “A Time for Optimism: Doing American Studies in an Era of Global Transformations.”

Afterward, a reception provided ample opportunity to continue discussions over a glass of wine.

July 11 – The Varieties of American Patriotism: Domestic Conflict over U.S. Foreign Policy from Munich to Korea 🗓

July 11 – The Varieties of American Patriotism: Domestic Conflict over U.S. Foreign Policy from Munich to Korea 🗓

Michaela Hoenicke Moore (University of Iowa)

 

The Varieties of American Patriotism: Domestic Conflict over U.S. Foreign Policy from Munich to Korea

July 11, 2017, 4-6 p.m.,  SB II 01-531

According to conventional understanding World War Two brought about an internationalist consensus at home yielding widespread domestic support for the country’s subsequent global, military role. A closer examination of how Americans responded to the dramatic events at mid-century, however, reveals a more complex picture. Ordinary citizens vigorously participated not only in the great debate preceding Pearl Harbor but also weighed in on public controversies of the early Cold War. These views at the grassroots level reveal a continuous practice of patriotic dissent and a deep reservoir of alternative visions for America’s role in the world.

Michaela Hoenicke Moore is Associate Professor of History at the University of Iowa. She has published three books, including a study on how Americans understood the Third Reich, entitled Know Your Enemy: The American Debate on Nazism, 1933-45 (Cambridge University Press, 2010) which won a national award for the best book in diplomatic history written by a woman. She is currently working on a project exploring “The Varieties of American Patriotism” and US foreign policy debates since the 1930s.

America First and the 4th of July 🗓

The Obama Institute for Transnational American Studies invites you to an original Fourth of July celebration in the spirit of Independence and the legacy of President Barack Obama. Two eminent speakers, Dr. David Sirakov, Director of the Atlantic Academy, and Prof. Philipp Gassert, President of the German Association of American Studies, will focus in their keynotes on transnational aspects of populism and global transformations, including an American note of optimism. Sandwiched in between these lectures are poster presentations by students and faculty of the Obama Institute. Their research projects amply document the multi-ethnic constitution of the United States and the transnational orientation of the American society, paradigmatically embodied in the Obama family. A reception will round off this celebration with toasts to America’s First ideas.

Invitation & Program (PDF)

June 29 – Krautrock and Transnationalism

June 29 – Krautrock and Transnationalism

Ulrich Adelt (University of Wyoming)

June 29, 2017, 6 p.m.,  P 106

This talk will engage discourses of popular music and transnationalism to discuss Krautrock, West German electronic music and rock from the 1970s. Groups such as Can, Neu!, Faust and Kraftwerk blended Influences of African American and Anglo-American music with the experimental and electronic music of European composers. The talk situates the music within its particular context of (trans)national identity and globalization. Krautrock and its offshoots have had a tremendous impact on musical production and reception in Britain and the U.S. since the 1970s. Genres such as indie, post-rock, techno and hip hop have drawn heavily on krautrock and have – ironically – connected a music that initially disavowed its European American and African American origins with the lived experience of whites and blacks in the U.S. and Europe. At the same time, while reaching for an imagined cosmic community, Krautrock, not only by its name, remains tied to essentialist notions of national identity and citizenship.
Ulrich Adelt is Associate Professor for American Studies at the University of Wyoming. His publications include Krautrock: German Music in the Seventies (University of Michigan Press 2016) and Blues Music in the Sixties: A Story in Black and White (Rutgers University Press 2010).